09 Jun Festivals Abroad: Summer 2015

  Although summer hasn’t technically begun (June 21 can’t come soon enough!), the season of music festivals is already well underway! Each year, the number of music festivals worldwide continues to grow, and while being abroad certainly adds a few hurdles to seeing your favorite artists on the circuit this summer, you’d be surprised at just how many international festivals there are that feature major headliners! Of course, we’re always ones to promote local bands, scenes, and cultures, but even locals get excited at the prospects of major international music artists playing their country. So, whether you’re looking to vibe out to electronic music, head bang through a few rock sets, or lightly sway side-to-side with your arms crossed while your favorite indie band strums along (kidding, kidding, not all indie fans are like this!), you’ll definitely find something to suit your tastes abroad this summer. You might even see your favorites along the way! Take a look at an abridged (seriously, there are hundreds) selection below, for just a taste of what you’ll find abroad. Greenfield Festival When: June 11-13, 2015 Where: Interlaken, Switzerland Headliners/notable acts: Slipknot, Motörhead, In Flames, Lamb of God, Gaslight Anthem Isle of Wight Festival When: June 11-14, 2015 Where: Isle of Wight, UK Headliners/notable acts: Blur, Fleetwood Mac, The Black Keys, The Prodigy, Pharrell Williams Orange Warsaw Festival When: June 12-14, 2015 Where: Warsaw, Poland Headliners/notable acts: Muse, The Chemical Brothers, Incubus, Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds, Bastille Secret Solstice When: June 19-21, 2015 Where: Reykjavík, Iceland Headliners/notable acts: Wu-Tang Clan, The Wailers, FKA...

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22 May Hit or Miss: North American songs that failed to chart in the US, and their successes abroad

With the advent of the Internet and streaming services such as YouTube and Spotify, music has become more readily accessible, in terms of both delivery platform and price. In turn, this has allowed for greater exposure for musical groups, both foreign and domestic, as users share music with each other effortlessly after a few simple clicks. Streaming services have had such a major impact on popular music that Billboard Magazine, which produces internationally recognized record charts each week, tweaked its algorithms to include on-demand streaming of individual songs to calculate its charts. Before the addition of streaming music plays, Billboard’s charts, along with most other international record charts, were constructed according to record sales (physical, and later digital). Radio was the most ubiquitous form of advertising and marketing musical groups, and the lack of open, easy, and inexpensive communication across the world created musical markets that were distinct from one another: what you heard in London would differ from what you heard in Berlin (and further still, it could differ between East and West Berlin). Of course, there were still international sensations (see the British Invasion), but on the whole, becoming a global hit was a more difficult achievement; artists were more likely to have regional success, simply by proximity. North-American artists would be more likely to sell well in North America, but there’s no guarantee for success in, say, the European markets. But what about artists that had little-to-no success within their...

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08 Apr Up and Under – Prague’s Cellar Bars

[caption id="attachment_2309" align="aligncenter" width="225"] I loved exploring the cellar bars in Prague![/caption] Before electricity and the modern conveniences of iceboxes and refrigerators, cellars were to way to go for keeping perishable goods cool and secure during hot summers, and a great place to keep fermenting wine from spoiling. While most cellars are built intentionally with these uses in mind, the cellars of Prague arose from more preventative measures: flood aversion. Built along the Vltava River, Prague sits in a beautiful river valley, though one that’s prone to aggressive flooding. During Prague’s settlement and construction during the 9th and 10th centuries, the threat of losing the ground floor of your home to water every few months was a very prominent threat. So prominent that over the course of a few decades, the citizens of Prague raised the street levels over 4 meters, converting what used to be ground-level rooms and halls into makeshift cellars! While most cellars conjure images of self-contained units without connecting rooms or much variety, the cellars throughout Prague are interconnected and massive: remnants of the original floors plans, unintended as underground havens. So what makes the cellars of Prague even more memorable? The fact that many have been turned into quiet, cozy bars where you can duck out of the sun and into the cool, cavernous interiors. Each cellar bar in Prague offers it’s own charm, and it’d be a shame to leave Prague without having descended into at least...

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09 Mar The world celebrates International Women’s Day!

Yesterday, the world united in a celebration of women around the world: International Women’s Day. Every year on March 8, millions of people around the world unite to celebrate the achievements the world has made in pursuing equality for women and the opportunities that are available to women around the world, and to strive to make further progress in the name of gender equality. Of course, there are still many steps to be taken toward gender equality, and the road forward is not a smooth one. But as we move forward, let’s focus on some of the highlights and events held along the way. WOW - Women of the World Festival [caption id="attachment_1598" align="aligncenter" width="720"] Courtesy https://www.facebook.com/womenoftheworldfestival?fref=photo and Victor Frankowski[/caption] This eight day festival began and March 1 and culminated on March 8, International Women's Day. It's impossible to describe the sheer number of events that took place, although highlights include speakers Caitlin Moran, Sarah Brown, and Safak Pavey, the first disabled woman elected to Turkish Parliament. The festival was headlined by tUnE-yArDs, whose front woman Merrill Garbus is a prominent proponent of gender equality. SheTalksYVR Conference [caption id="attachment_1597" align="aligncenter" width="836"] Courtesy shetalksyvr.ca/[/caption] This year featured the inaugural SheTalksYVR event, held in Surrey, Canada. Featuring 15 women all from the west coast of Canada, the conference invited each speaker to answer the following: "How are you changing your world?" Speakers included Maria Kritikos, the entrepreneur and founder of the Ladies Who Lunch network, published and activist Jodie Emery,...

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08 Feb Knocking down the price of interning abroad

The New York Times recently gave a shout out to international internships, and Panrimo in particular! While the article made a point to address the pros and cons of interning abroad (international experience looks great on a résumé, but the skills you learn while interning are just as, if not more, important), cost proved a major discussion point. Arguments abound when it comes to privilege and the accessibility of international internships, and Panrimo is dedicated to providing internships for all types of students, and we want to offer advice and insight into making interning abroad an affordable reality for everyone. Below, you’ll find a few suggestions on how to minimize your expenses for international internships! Utilize the major scholarship search engines There are dozens of databases available that are explicitly dedicated to indexing available scholarships for students. This should be your first step in searching for scholarships, as these resources are already compiled for you! You’ll find our favorite resources below: NAFSA's Scholarship Resources StudyAbroad.com Scholarships International Scholarship Search Foundation for Global Scholars GoOverseas.com Scholarships After that, search anywhere and everywhere for scholarship Scholarships can come from some incredibly strange places. Panrimo’s Director of Admissions, Dominic Palazzolo, received several scholarships from his hometown’s baseball league. There’s a scholarship available for left-handed students (yes, for real. Check it out here). The Rotary Foundation offers grants to students who are willing to apply. Panrimo’s University Relations Manager, Ellen Knuth, even found scholarships available for students who are willing to learn about fire sprinklers and...

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15 Dec Panrimo’s favorite holiday cookies: Get ’em while they’re hot!

As the holidays draw near, we begin to reflect upon the things that make us happy: successfully completing finals, spending time lounging with family, welcoming visiting friends who have moved out of town, and, of course, eating cookies. While we all have our taste preferences (“who even likes chocolate?” – me, when presented with chocolate), familial traditions certainly play an influence on these. So, after taking a survey of my colleagues’ cookie traditions, I proudly present the abridged version of Panrimo’s favorite holiday cookies. We could go on forever, but we’ve selected seven! Joulutortut - Finnish Pinwheels (Finnish) [caption id="attachment_1310" align="aligncenter" width="1000"] Courtesy of hovkonditorn.blogspot.com.[/caption] Finnish pinwheels, or Joulutortut, are as much a visual delight as they are tasty. Joulutortut are a combination of rich, buttery dough -- made with plenty of whipped cream -- wrapped carefully around a plum and date mixture. The resulting shape signifies an important facet of Finnish culture while also tasting wonderful. Pizelle (Italian) [caption id="attachment_1311" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Courtesy of bigalittlea.com.[/caption] Although typically a holiday treat, pizzelle have become extremely popular, and you can certainly find them off-season. Light, crispy, and thin, pizzelle are considered one of the oldest known cookies, and are typically presented during festivities. Try them with ice cream, or add a dollop of cannoli cream and squish two pizzelle together to create a cannoli sandwich. Perfect for the holidays! Shortbread cookies (English) [caption id="attachment_1312" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Courtesy of www.chefeddy.com.[/caption] Although not necessarily associated with the holidays, short bread cookies are almost...

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07 Nov 5 Weird and Wild European Festivals

If you’re the kind of traveller who seeks out off-the-beaten experiences, then you’ll want to check out some of Europe’s lesser-known festivals. From a bonfire of huge puppets in Valencia to an underwater bike race through a cold Welsh bog, here are five of Europe’s most vibrant and eccentric events. [caption id="attachment_1210" align="aligncenter" width="500"] Photo courtesy of http://blog.ramtrucks.com.[/caption] Thorrablot Festival, Reykjavik, Iceland Culinary adventurers can taste ancient Viking fare such as ram’s testicles, rotten shark, whale blubber, boiled sheep’s heads, and seal flippers at the annual Thorrablot festival, which starts in mid-January. Or you can swig down some Brennivin, a potent local brew made with potato and caraway, and sample more palatable dishes at Reykjavik restaurants. This midwinter festival commemorates Thor, the Norse god of Thunder, with a month of feasting, storytelling and merriment. [caption id="attachment_1211" align="aligncenter" width="558"] Photo courtesy of https://beltanefiresociety.files.wordpress.com.[/caption] Beltane Fire Festival, Edinburgh, Scotland Mark the birth of summer with drumming, fire displays and pagan drama at Beltane Fire Festival, held at the end of May in the ruins of a replica Parthenon overlooking Edinburgh. Inspired by the ancient Gaelic traditions of the Beltane festival, this riotous celebration features a procession of mythical characters, including the May Queen and mischievous Red Men. Watch their elemental story play out with 12,000 or so other revelers. [caption id="attachment_1212" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Photo courtesy of http://locuraviajes.com.[/caption] Mountain Bike Bog Snorkeling, Llanwrtyd Wells, Wales For absurdist comedy, an underwater bike race through a cold peat bog is hard to beat. Each...

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20 Oct 7 strange wedding traditions from around the world

In case you hadn’t heard, there have been a few major celebrity weddings this year, including George Clooney and Amal Alamuddin, and, infamously, Kanye West and Kim Kardashian (in a ceremony that launched a thousand Instagram posts). While Kimye may have bucked most traditional wedding traditions in favor of a more contemporary ceremony, they did retain a few, including a healthy floral arrangement. Keeping wedding traditions in mind, here are seven strange traditions that you’ll find in various cultures! The Blackening of the Bride in Scotland [caption id="attachment_1146" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Thanks, family and friends!Photo courtesy of http://balintoreholidaycottage.files.wordpress.com[/caption] How much do you love bacon grease? Feathers? Soot? Imagine all of these mixed together with a healthy portion of water and mischief, then dumped over your entire body the day before your wedding. Sound fun? Now, imagine getting tied to a tree while covered in the grime, of course after a healthy portion of alcohol. Welcome to one of Scotland’s wedding traditions! While this originally began as a way to ward evil sprits and has fallen from practice, there are still several Scottish villages that relish this marriage ritual.   French Decadence   [caption id="attachment_1147" align="aligncenter" width="622"] ...

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14 Aug Carrying on the Tradition

We all have our favorite cultural traditions. Whether it’s celebrating 4th of July in the US, Bastille Day in France, or Holi with our Indian friends, each culture brings it’s own unique heritage and traditions to the table. And the Scots are no different! If you’re itching to learn about some of Scotland’s most notable traditions, look no further. Here are, in no particular order, Panrimo’s favorite Scottish traditions! 7.) Bagpipes One of the most obvious Scottish symbols, bagpipes were first recorded in Scotland in the mid 1500s. Made from a several different pieces faceted together, including the bag itself, typically made from animal skins, the bagpipe is known for its distinctive sound and the drones produced when playing it. 6.) Haggis Another iconic Scottish classic, haggis is presented as a savory pudding, haggis is a combination of sheeps ‘pluck’ (heart, liver, and lungs) and minced onions, oatmeal, spices, stock, and salt, all encased in sheep stomach. Pleasant, huh? While most haggis is now prepared in casing as opposed to stomach, the ingredients remain the same. 5.) Kilts Although originally associated with the Highlands, kilts are now ubiquitously associated with Scottish culture. Although previously worn frequently, kilts are now generally relegated to formal events, or competitions in Highland games. 4.) Highland Games The origins of Highland games predate written history, and are integral to Scottish Highland culture. There are several categories of events, including heavy games, music, dance, and other events as well. You’ll likely know them from...

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13 Aug Holding Out for a Hero

We've all heard the stories of Sir William Wallace (or at least seen Braveheart) and know of the epic accomplishments he achieved. But what about other Scottish heroes? In the wild North of Scotland, some of the world’s most important figures grew to change the world. Without further ado, here are Panrimo’s 7 favorite Scottish heroes, in no particular order. 7.) Robert the Bruce [caption id="attachment_988" align="aligncenter" width="185"] That beard! That axe! That Bruce![/caption] http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a3/Robertthebruce.jpg One of Scotland’s most famous heroes, Robert the Bruce was King of Scots from 1306-1329 and led the Scots during the Wars of Scottish Independence. While he commanded several major successful battles, his most famous may be the Battle of Bannockburn, where he defeated the much larger English army under Edward II, thus confirming the establishment of a Scottish monarchy. 6.) Agnes ‘Black Agnes’ Randolph  [caption id="attachment_989" align="aligncenter" width="316"] Dressed to impress.[/caption] http://www.medievalarchives.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Black-Agnes-countess-of-dunbar.jpg An example of Scotland’s strong female characters, Agnes Randolph, Countess of Dunbar, was besieged at Dunbar while her husband was off fighting English forces due to Edward Balliol’s attempt to seize the Scottish crown from David II. English forces began besieging her castle, but Agnes held strong for over five months with only servants and a few guards, forcing the English to finally concede their defeat. During the besiegement, Agnes was rumored to have ordered her female servants to dress in their nicest clothes, parade along the castle walls, and lightly dust the damage the English had done, taunting them...

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