12 Jan Wish, Kiss, and Touch

The new year is here! 2015 is the year for travel and discovery, and all the personal wealth that comes with it. We’ve put together a list of places for you to go this year that are not only beautiful and entrenched in history, they will bring you good fortune. 1. Edinburgh, Scotland- Grayfriar Bobby Statue Meet the most famous and beloved terrier of Scotland, Grayfriars Bobby. His life-size statue stands near the main entrance of Greyfriar Kirkyard, a cemetery in Edinburgh’s Old Town. The statue was erected to memorialize the Skye Terrier who kept faithful watch over his master’s grave for 14 years until his own death in 1872. A tombstone marks his actual burial site in Kirkyard, where he rests eternally near the grave of his owner John Gray. The story has unfortunately been discredited by recent research, but tourists still enjoy rubbing the nose of the loyal pup for good fortune. City officials encourage you to pet gently, not because he bites, but because his nose has undergone some damage over the years from repeated touching. [caption id="attachment_1340" align="alignnone" width="189"] http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Greyfriars_Bobby_statue,_Edinburgh.JPG[/caption] So sweet. 2. Blarney, Co. Cork, Ireland- Blarney Castle Kiss it, it’s Irish! When you’re in Ireland, be sure to visit the Blarney Castle and kiss the Blarney Stone for the “gift of the gab.” According to legend, proprietor of the castle Cormac MacCarthy was being denied his land owning rights by Queen Elizabeth I. Feeling helpless to argue his case, he...

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07 Jan Raise a Glass

Think Italy, think wine. Or should that be think Italy, drink wine? The country is home to some of the world’s oldest wine regions - Etruscans and Greeks were making wine here even before the famously hedonistic Romans got into large-scale wine production in 200 BC. Today Italy is the world’s largest wine producer after France. Grapes are grown in almost every Italian region of the country and around one in fifty Italians take part in the annual grape harvest. To truly appreciate Italy’s winemaking traditions, you really need to tour of one of the countries many vineyards. There are more than a million vineyards, so lucky for you, we’ve narrowed it down to three of the best. Remember to call ahead to book a tour.   Ceretto Aziende Vitivinicole, Alba, Piedmont The Ceretto family have been making wine for over three generations. With a vineyard that spans 140 hectares across four villages of the Piedmont’s Langhe, the family have made a name for themselves for their unique mix of wine cultivation and contemporary art. As well as the grapevines, the property features historic chapels and statues restored by notable artists and architects. Villa Vignamaggio, Greve in Chianti, Tuscany This 14th century villa was first built by the Gherardini family in the late Middle Ages. Brimming with luscious cypress trees, the villa features views of the Tuscan countryside e worthy of a coming-of-age love story. Sample the exquisite variety of Sangiovese wine, and stay overnight in some very luxurious, old-world accommodation. Planeta’s Cantina dell’Ulmo,...

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19 Dec December 25: Not Just Jolly

The fact that December 25 is Christmas shouldn’t come as a shock (if it does: Surprise!) As with any other day of the year, a lot happens on the 25th of December: births, deaths, marriages, intrigue, revelations…and that’s just the tip of the iceberg! So this year as you gather with your family, keep in mind that on this day there is quite a bit more happening than gift giving and cookies. 5) 1776 – Washington defeats 1,400 Hessian soldiers The best part about Washington’s victorious crossing of the Delaware River was that it worked BECAUSE it was Christmas. America’s first president was well aware that the British-employed German troops would be drinking themselves silly and used their festivities against them, sneaking into town at night and beating them while they were too hungover to care. How’s that for Christmas cheer? 4) 1642 - Isaac Newton was born Being born on Christmas comes with its own unique set of angsty issues (never having a bday-only party, gifts meant to “take care of both”, Christmas-themed bday cake, etc.), but luckily Newton never let it get him down. Gravity on the other hand… 3) 1932 – King George V’s chair collapses Though there were hundreds of staff and supporters thoroughly committed to keeping the British Monarch safe from harm, no one correctly predicted the true threat: his chair. During the middle of a holiday dinner speech, George V’s seat gave way, depositing the thoroughly startled king onto the very posh...

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15 Dec Panrimo’s favorite holiday cookies: Get ’em while they’re hot!

As the holidays draw near, we begin to reflect upon the things that make us happy: successfully completing finals, spending time lounging with family, welcoming visiting friends who have moved out of town, and, of course, eating cookies. While we all have our taste preferences (“who even likes chocolate?” – me, when presented with chocolate), familial traditions certainly play an influence on these. So, after taking a survey of my colleagues’ cookie traditions, I proudly present the abridged version of Panrimo’s favorite holiday cookies. We could go on forever, but we’ve selected seven! Joulutortut - Finnish Pinwheels (Finnish) [caption id="attachment_1310" align="aligncenter" width="1000"] Courtesy of hovkonditorn.blogspot.com.[/caption] Finnish pinwheels, or Joulutortut, are as much a visual delight as they are tasty. Joulutortut are a combination of rich, buttery dough -- made with plenty of whipped cream -- wrapped carefully around a plum and date mixture. The resulting shape signifies an important facet of Finnish culture while also tasting wonderful. Pizelle (Italian) [caption id="attachment_1311" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Courtesy of bigalittlea.com.[/caption] Although typically a holiday treat, pizzelle have become extremely popular, and you can certainly find them off-season. Light, crispy, and thin, pizzelle are considered one of the oldest known cookies, and are typically presented during festivities. Try them with ice cream, or add a dollop of cannoli cream and squish two pizzelle together to create a cannoli sandwich. Perfect for the holidays! Shortbread cookies (English) [caption id="attachment_1312" align="aligncenter" width="640"] Courtesy of www.chefeddy.com.[/caption] Although not necessarily associated with the holidays, short bread cookies are almost...

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12 Dec Trim Your Tree

Nothing gets you more in the spirit of the season like decorating your home for the holidays. The lights, the glittery tree ornaments, the smell of fresh pine...

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10 Dec ‘Tis the Season to Sing in Different Languages

As we’re approaching the holidays, we’ve put together a list of jingles to bring you some cheer and help get you into the holiday spirit! Check out Panrimo’s top 7 (foreign language) Christmas carols! May you enjoy these videos and may the lyrics stick in your head. 1. Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer- Come on, don’t act like you don’t sing along to this song when it comes on the radio in your car (or your iTunes playlist). Did you know that the story of Rudolph was originally created for a coloring book in 1939? It wasn’t until ten years later that the story was adapted into a song. If you think it’s good in English, wait til you hear this Spanish rendition! [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FT7CqWb1PEU[/embed] 2. Frosty the Snowman- Now Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer had to be a tough act to follow, but “Frosty” couldn’t have been a better choice. Gene Autry, who recorded Rudolph, had arguably as much success with the release of this cheery tune a year later. The only thing better than the song is the animated film adaptation that followed, personifying the snowman and forever transforming him into everything that is Christmas nostalgia. As a treat, we’ve got a live recording in German! Frosty der Schneemann! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctg9yHRTzGI 3. Silent Night- This classic carol was composed in 1818 in Austria and has since been translated into as many as 140 different languages. The song is reported to have been sung simultaneously by French, British,...

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05 Dec Gruss vom Krampus!

The holiday season is quickly approaching, and children in many parts of the world are anxiously awaiting a visit from jolly old St. Nick. However, the children of Europe's Alpine Region are expecting a visit from a more sinister character tonight...

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01 Dec Warm Up, Buttercup

While it may not yet be calendar official, winter has certainly arrived. Warm up with Panrimo’s top 7 cozy winter warm-up drinks from around the world. 1. Irish Coffee- Why have coffee when you can have coffee with whisky? Coffee, sugar, whisky, and cream floated on top, to be exact. The drink is said to have originated to warm up a group of Americans after they arrived in Ireland in freezing cold weather. The bartender graciously added a shot of whisky to everyone’s coffee for an extra warming effect. So hospitable, those Irish! [caption id="attachment_1249" align="alignnone" width="260"] http://www.52kitchenadventures.com/2011/08/17/irish-coffee/[/caption] 2. Mulled Wine- Hot wine is not quite so common in the states as it is in Europe, though it is becoming more and more popular (yay!). Many variations of this warm winter drink exist, but it basically involves heating wine and adding spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, and often orange or lemon peels. Hot, delicious, and festive. Tried and tested- it's good! [caption id="attachment_1248" align="alignnone" width="300"] http://tastygorgeous.com/2013/12/04/countdown-christmas-marvellous-mulled-wine/[/caption] 3. Caribou- Canadians know what cold is, so I trust that this is an effective way to combat winter chills. This cocktail of red wine, whisky, and maple syrup keeps les Quebecois nice and toasty, especially in the month of February when the Carnaval de Québec takes place in Quebec City. The winter festival draws throngs of people into the cold outdoors to watch winter sporting events, parades, and snow sculpture contests! [caption id="attachment_1247" align="alignnone" width="300"] http://www.pri.org/stories/2014-02-14/quebecs-secret-recipe-beating-cold-its-caribou Credit: Marcus Teply[/caption] 4. Hot...

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24 Nov Turkey Time

The Panrimo offices are full of pre-Thanksgiving cheer and we've combined this with our obvious international inclinations to bring you: PANRIMO'S CURSORY INTERNATIONAL GUIDE TO TURKEY SOUNDS First up, American English. Turkeys are well known and well eaten on the North American continent. So their cry of "Gobble gobble gobble" should come as no surprise. (Please note the historically appropriate headgear) [caption id="attachment_1234" align="alignnone" width="640"] American turkeys have a proclivity for flag waving.[/caption] Our second turkey hails from the European nation of Belgium. It should come as no surprise that Belgian turkeys quite enjoy a nice stack of waffles, washed down with Duvel. Afterwards they remark on the deliciousness with their call of "Irka kloek kloek." [caption id="attachment_1235" align="alignnone" width="640"] Clearly a turkey with a finely-honed palate.[/caption] No turkey gathering would be complete without the high-class French turkey. Easily the most refined of birds, he often coos "Glou glou" towards the rising spires of that most French of buildings, the Eiffel Tower. [caption id="attachment_1236" align="alignnone" width="640"] French turkey never leaves the coop without his beret.[/caption] Finally, we have Mexican turkey. Quite a rebel, he likes to conceal his true identity behind his Lucha Libre mask, which pairs well with his festive sombrero. His cry of "Goro goro goro" strikes fear into the heart of those hoping to eat him for Thanksgiving. [caption id="attachment_1237" align="alignnone" width="640"] Don't mess with this bird.[/caption] So now you know. Armed with your new international turkey knowledge, go forth and have an excellent holiday, Panroamers!...

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18 Nov The Third Thursday of November

We all know what the fourth Thursday of November means (turkey of course…just turkey), but how about the third Thursday of November? Admittedly, it’s not quite as celebrated here in the states as it is in France, but it is starting to catch on. This Thursday, November 20th at 12:01 am, is the official release of the Beaujolais Nouveau, a very young red wine with a short fermentation process from the Beaujolais region in eastern France. The wine is bottled only about six to eight weeks after being harvested, making it light and fruity in flavor, and generally disliked by the French. At least for the sophisticated pallet, the accelerated production process doesn’t make for a high-quality wine, but the tradition has nonetheless become a reason to celebrate! [caption id="attachment_1226" align="alignnone" width="300"] http://ufeseattle.wordpress.com/2014/09/30/beaujolais-nouveau-2014-avec-la-faccpnw/[/caption] Woooooo! The tradition dates back to the 19th century, where it began in Beaujolais as a local celebration, marking the end of the grape harvest. Over time, the festivities eventually spread to Paris and all across France- and with some brilliant marketing, across the Atlantic; the United States is now one of its largest importers, with Germany and Japan taking the lead. [caption id="attachment_1228" align="alignnone" width="300"] http://www.someecards.com/usercards/viewcard/dbe7d243a34cab5937bba4168a4aed9c88[/caption] Not exactly random. See below! Why the third Thursday of November? In the 1950s, French law dictated that wine could not be sold until December 15th of the year of its harvest. Because the point of the beaujolais is to drink it shortly after harvest, this...

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