03 Sep Parlez-Vous Céfran?

Say what? I started studying French in high school.  Then, I majored in it at the University of Michigan.  Then, I studied abroad in Grenoble.  Then, I taught English in Normandy for eight months.  Then, I taught French for a few years. Then, I moved to Lorraine for a while.  You could say that I spoke French fairly well at this point, and I did, but I kept hearing words pop up in conversation that I had never heard of before, like, ever. [caption id="attachment_1075" align="alignnone" width="272"] But seriously, what?[/caption] http://www.imostateblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/huh1.gif So, finally I asked someone what this word (meuf) was that I kept hearing over and over and over, and then it all made sense: Verlan. Verlan is a form of the French language common among the youth, the word “verlan” being an example itself of how the language functions. It basically works like this: take the syllables of a word and switch them. Easy enough, right? The French word “l’envers” (meaning inverse) is pronounced “lan-ver.” Switch the order of these two syllables, thus pronouncing the word inversely and voilà, you have the word “Verlan.” Clever, oui? Here’s a list of commonplace “verlanised” words that you’re sure to hear at some point in conversation with a young French person. Words that are only one syllable work a little differently, but you get the idea: Verlan                  Original word              Meaning meuf                                 femme      ...

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