20 May Drink It All In

We’re often told not to judge a book by its cover, but I have absolutely done so. I also generally choose wine based on the label design, purses by their designer, and household cleaners by their mascots. The irresistible power of marketing confronts us at every corner and I can’t say it bothers me. With that in mind, I recently went through a long, LONG list of international soft drinks and chose the ones I would most like to try based solely on their names. Keep in mind that I have no idea what these drinks taste like, so don’t take this as a suggestion. It’s merely a silly exercise in “Well, if I could, why not?” Manzanita Deliciosa – Mexico How can anyone resist a drink named “deliciosa”? This is a traditional apple-flavored soda which apparently makes an excellent pairing with Mexican food. Midnight Taco Bell run anyone? Chubby – Trinidad and Tobago Luckily this name refers to the cute little bottles and NOT the after-effects it has on your body. Apparently the main target is children between the ages of 4 and 9, but they got me hook, line, and sinker. Schwip Schwap – Germany Just try saying this drink name with a German accent, isn't it amazing? I would order this just to have the chance to say it aloud. This orange-flavored cola is a strong seller and is actually produced by Pepsi! Splashe Back O’ Bourke Cola – Australia The unnecessary “e” at the end...

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06 May Where the World Vacations

Spring is here and with it comes the inevitable urge to travel during the upcoming summer months. Though the vast majority of Americans travel domestically, there are still those who wander farther. These are the people who dream of tropical getaways to Mexico, or hiking adventures in the northern wilds of Canada. These are the travelers who don’t feel fulfilled until there is a new stamp in their passport and a new security tag on their baggage. Seasonal wanderlust is hardly limited to Americans. In fact, Europeans are famous for their vacations. It certainly helps to live on a continent full of distinct nations easily reached by a car trip or short plane flight. Interestingly, a study conducted on travel trends for the EU noted that vacation destinations differ by nationality. Here are some of the results. Italians vacation in France. Yep, even Italians need a break from pasta occasionally. They head inland to the mountains and cities of France for a refreshing getaway. British go to Spain. It’s no secret that the Brits love the Mediterranean coast. Tans, tea, and tapas; Spain is the dream destination for everyone looking to escape the grey skies of England. The Irish visit the UK. This is a bit of a surprise until you consider that you can get a round trip from Dublin to London for $50. $50! You can hardly buy a suitcase for that price! Czech tourists choose Slovakia. Though not well known in the US, Slovakia is a gorgeous...

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24 Nov Turkey Time

The Panrimo offices are full of pre-Thanksgiving cheer and we've combined this with our obvious international inclinations to bring you: PANRIMO'S CURSORY INTERNATIONAL GUIDE TO TURKEY SOUNDS First up, American English. Turkeys are well known and well eaten on the North American continent. So their cry of "Gobble gobble gobble" should come as no surprise. (Please note the historically appropriate headgear) [caption id="attachment_1234" align="alignnone" width="640"] American turkeys have a proclivity for flag waving.[/caption] Our second turkey hails from the European nation of Belgium. It should come as no surprise that Belgian turkeys quite enjoy a nice stack of waffles, washed down with Duvel. Afterwards they remark on the deliciousness with their call of "Irka kloek kloek." [caption id="attachment_1235" align="alignnone" width="640"] Clearly a turkey with a finely-honed palate.[/caption] No turkey gathering would be complete without the high-class French turkey. Easily the most refined of birds, he often coos "Glou glou" towards the rising spires of that most French of buildings, the Eiffel Tower. [caption id="attachment_1236" align="alignnone" width="640"] French turkey never leaves the coop without his beret.[/caption] Finally, we have Mexican turkey. Quite a rebel, he likes to conceal his true identity behind his Lucha Libre mask, which pairs well with his festive sombrero. His cry of "Goro goro goro" strikes fear into the heart of those hoping to eat him for Thanksgiving. [caption id="attachment_1237" align="alignnone" width="640"] Don't mess with this bird.[/caption] So now you know. Armed with your new international turkey knowledge, go forth and have an excellent holiday, Panroamers!...

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03 Aug Studying abroad: Professors make the difference

[caption id="attachment_2200" align="alignnone" width="660"] The building is impressive. The people inside it are amazing.[/caption] During my second semester freshman year in college I befriended a geography professor. Or maybe it was he who befriended me. We got along great. He was gearing up for his annual abroad program in the Mexican Yucatan where, each summer, he took a group of students. He asked me to assist him in research, and went so far as to write letters of recommendation getting me into my university’s honors program to apply for travel scholarships. It was my first time going overseas. I wasn’t a geography major. And my interest in science came to an explosive halt back in elementary school when I added too much baking soda to my Mount Vesuvius volcano. I blew off ceiling tiles. But Dr. Biles sold me on the abroad experience first, the work second. After two months overseas, however, it was both the experiences in a different country and my research work that made my time abroad memorable. A reputable international studies survey is released each November. Last year’s report shows that the top two majors of US college students studying abroad are social sciences and business/management. Foreign language is seventh. What does this mean? Many things, but to my point it shows business majors studying abroad are likely enrolling in business classes abroad, not a foreign language. Students study abroad what they’re studying back home. In my case I was the...

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