16 Mar Sláinte!

Looking for cosy wooden booths, Gaelic beer on tap and a friendly, no-nonsense bartender who will spin you a yarn? There’s a reason Irish pubs have become a worldwide phenomenon. You’ve doubtless been to one in your own city, but what about in Ireland? What are the best Irish pubs and where can you find them? Glad you asked… +++ O’Loclainn’s, Ballyvaughan This non-descript bar, tucked away in the back of an alley, is a popular haunt for long-time locals. While it’s just a small room with a stove, this little pub has one of the city’s most impressive selections of whiskies.   Hi-B, Cork No larger than a living room, Hi-B is notorious for its stringent upkeep of Irish traditions. The tiny bar is virtually unchanged since it first opened 90 years ago. Mobiles are banned and whisky is welcomed.   O'Riada’s, Kilkenny This small, often overcrowded pub is a lovably shambolic place to stop and have a pint. Enjoy a strong Guinness or get lost in its labyrinthine corridors to get a taste for this real Irish pub.   Mulligan’s of Poolbeg St, Dublin Considered one of the last big-name Irish pubs that has not bowed down to commercialism, Mulligan’s is a time-warp to the Ireland of the 1850’s. Ignore the television – its only modern addition – and appreciate the hand-carved wooden paneling and cozy rustic interior.   Tigh Neachtain's, Galway What could be better than snuggling by an open fire with a large glass of stout? If you’re after an authentic Irish...

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05 Aug Hole in the Wall

Top 7 Scottish Pubs While Scotland may not command the respect that Ireland does in terms of pubs, it still boasts a respectable pub culture. And of course, while it’s incredibly difficult to do so, Panrimo has compiled a list of Scotland’s best pubs. Whether it’s in a nook down the street or one of the most recognized establishments in the city (or even country), you’ll always have a good time bellying up to the bar and grabbing a drink at each of Panrimo’s top 7 favorite pubs! 7.) Applecross Inn [caption id="attachment_969" align="aligncenter" width="347"] An apple a day keeps the doctor away, does drinking here daily count?[/caption] http://www.applecross.uk.com/inn/images/inn.jpg One of Scotland’s more remote pubs, you won’t be disappointed making the trek out to this inn. Located in Applecross on the far West side of Scotland and overlooking the water to the Isle of Skye, you’ll reach Applecross after passing through Britain’s highest mountain pass, Bealllach na Ba. But once you arrive, you’ll find a quaint little inn with a beautiful waterside location, plenty of great food, and fresh beer on draught. 6.) The Anderson [caption id="attachment_970" align="aligncenter" width="550"] Turret room = win.[/caption] http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/01/2e/43/60/the-building.jpg Located just outside Inverness in Fortrose, the Anderson has picked up several culinary awards throughout Scotland. In addition to over 100 Belgian beers to choose from, the Anderson has also recently unveiled Knitting Nights, where skilled knitters or even beginners can kick back, pick up their needles, and enjoy a pint as well. 5.) The Halfway House [caption...

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03 Nov Tours, Tastes, and Tradition: Shakespeare’s Stratford-upon-Avon

[caption id="attachment_2314" align="alignnone" width="660"] Feeling poetic yet?[/caption] It’s chilly this early in London. You wake up early for your Stratford-upon-Avon excursion. You walk to the train station, feeling your bag bounce with each step. Inside tumbles The Riverside Shakespeare, a hefty book containing Shakespeare’s plays; his impact upon London, literature, and love. The train ride takes 3 hours to Stratford. There’s time to kill. A “Free Wi-Fi” sign stares at you. Now would be the perfect time to watch Anonymous, the thriller questioning Shakespeare’s existence (scholars are still debating, and you have yet to be convinced of either side). However, you’ve left your computer. You bury your head in the Riverside, oblivious to the time passing. You’ve arrived! Stepping off the train, you meet up with your coordinator before heading toward the River Avon. Ironically, ‘afon,’ the Welsh word from which ‘Avon’ takes its name, translates as “river,” literally titling it, “River River.” Here, walk along the river, stopping to take in the incredible architecture and quaint riverbanks behind them. You’ll be literally following the footsteps of Shakespeare, admiring the magnificent Royal Shakespeare Theatre and Swan Theatre, both featuring an incredible selection of performances. Learn with your coordinator how Shakespeare began to hone his imagery, with phrases forming in your head as you continue strolling down the street: Shall I compare thee to a Summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And Summer's lease hath all too short a date - Sonnet...

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